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Category: interaction design

Notes on CES 2014

Last week I went to the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, mostly to see interesting connected devices. What follows is a summary of some of the highlights, for me.

If you’re in the motion tracker business, you’re in trouble. There were several dozen of your competitors on display. In fact, many of the trackers appeared to be little more than a light wrapper of user experience design and industrial design around existing accelerometers, gyrometers, and other motion sensors. The silicon vendors making the sensors themselves, like InvenSense, showed a wide array of sensors that have the motion detection algorithms built right into the sensor.

If you’re a Bluetooth Low Energy expert, you’re in high demand. a large number of the devices on display connected to other devices using Bluetooth LE.  There were some WiFi-connected devices as well, of course. Other than Samsung and LG, I saw very few manufacturers using NFC to connect devices, however.

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Practice, Practice, Practice

Ashlynn Dewey just sent me links to a new Nike+ ad that she ran across that reminded her of our physical computing class(thanks, Ash!). It’s a great video that shows a couple of supercool Japanese DJs making music on specially equipped Nike shoes. I really enjoyed it. Then I saw the “making of” video.

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Random thoughts on consciousness and physical experience, coming together

I just had one of those wonderful moments where a bunch of ideas that had been floating around in my head for a number of years came together and made sense, thanks to a section of Alva Noë’s book Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness. In Chapter 4, he challenges the common metaphor for the brain as the “Mission Control”  of the body — the place where all stimulation comes in and is noted, processed, and responded to. Instead, he says, our perception, and even our reaction, is distributed throughout our body and even through our environment.  To counter this, he offers the example of a snail’s response to being touched. At first touch, the snail will recoil, but with repeated touches, the snail becomes habituated to the touch, and doesn’t recoil. The sensory neurons in the snail’s nervous system are linked to the motor neurons, and the response to the initial touch is to cue the motor neurons to move the snail away.  As repeated touches occur, the snail’s nervous system learns the pattern as “normal” and the connection between the motor neurons and the sensory stimulus is lessened over time.  There’s no central brain managing this — the change is a result of the connection between the neurons and the patterns of action in the environment in which the snail is embedded, argues Noë. It’s not just about the changing in the coupling between the sensory neurons and the motor neurons, because that change would not occur without the repeated pattern of touch that the snail encounters.  It all happens without a “mission control” brain to process it.

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